herumtreiber: (Default)
I'm posting this meme, which I took from [livejournal.com profile] edith_jones, in the spirit of Samhain and All Souls' Day.

1. What's the scariest book you've ever read?
2. When was the first time you were ever really frightened by a book?
3. True crime - do you read it and if so, whose books do you enjoy?
4. Ghost stories - do you read them? Name a favourite if you're a fan.
5. Horror - do you read it? Whose works do you like?
6. Do you read non-fiction works about the paranormal, the occult, ESP, ghosts, UFOs, or life after death? If so, what do you particularly enjoy reading about?
7. Is there an author whose works you find frightening even though they're not writing in the ghost story/horror/thriller categories?
8. Is there an author whose books you won't read because you find their books too scary?
9. Have you ever written any scary fiction or non-fiction yourself?
10. Give a recommendation of something within the confines of this meme that you think others would enjoy.


My answers below the cut... )


herumtreiber: (Default)
I found this meme on the web:

Each person suggests up to five books that would define them; that is, by reading them you would get a sense about them. What books would you suggest, that tell something about you? Explain a little about why you picked the book.
Challenge: Define yourself by books


The five books )

herumtreiber: (Default)
I found this on the web. There's this  list of 100 top SF/Fantasy books which became a meme. So here it is: 
--
Bold the ones you've read, strike the ones (books or series) you abandoned. If it's a series and you've read one or more, but not all of the books, underline it.


Read more... )
herumtreiber: (boat)
A question meme I found on the web :)

1. One book that changed your life?
2. One book you have read more than once?
3. One book you would want on a desert island?
4. One book that made you laugh?
5. One book that made you cry?
6. One book you wish had been written?
7. One book you wish had never had been written?
8. One book you are currently reading?
9. One book you have been meaning to read?


My answers.... )


herumtreiber: (window)
Pick a number and I'll answer the question.
1 - Your current OTP
2 - A pairing you initially didn’t consider but someone changed your mind
3 - A pairing you have never liked and probably never will
............

I asked myself the questions, and below are the multilingual answers:


1. Your current OTP... )


herumtreiber: (Default)


How vulgar, this hankering after immortality how vain, how false. Composers are merely scribblers of cave paintings. One writes music because winter is eternal and because, if one didn’t, the wolves and blizzards would be at one’s throat all the sooner.
Cloud Atlas, by David Mitchell

The book is interesting. I'm stuck at page 65 though; I'm afraid I don't read as avidly as I used to :)

herumtreiber: (Default)

Amongst the first 30 Harry/Draco fics I read was The Reader by Aja. I love this story because it deals with the power of words; how they affect the mood of people facing overwhelming odds. It's a stark tale, laced with hope in the figure of the Reader.

The story has stuck in my mind through the years, and I have reread it once or twice. It's a very uplifting tale in which Draco plays an unforgettable role.
I liked and admired Harry from the books, but some fanfic authors - they made me love Draco :)

herumtreiber: (cloud atlas)


“All stories are about wolves. All worth repeating, that is. Anything else is sentimental drivel.
All of them?
Sure, he says. Think about it. There's escaping from the wolves, fighting the wolves, capturing the wolves, taming the wolves. Being thrown to the wolves, or throwing others to the wolves so the wolves will eat them instead of you. Running with the wolf pack. Turning into a wolf. Best of all, turning into the head wolf.
No other decent stories exist.”


Margaret Atwood



herumtreiber: (space!jake22)
I love space. Seems like I always have, ever since I read my first science-fiction story, or watched that first TV show in a misty, half-forgotten time. To gaze up at the sky and wonder what's out there…

… to float in mid-air, borne by the tiny currents aboard a spaceship as I look down at the blue limb of the Earth, shrouded in clouds and curving in the infinite horizon below me. To reach my hand, seemingly able to grasp all that ever was.

I won't do that, but I've imagined it, borne by the tales of sci-fi authors. They've taken me to other galaxies; to the dawn and sunset of the Solar System, the Universe even.

I love hard science-fiction. It's not only due to the shiny spaceships, rather to the way the authors adhere to the rules, even if they pull the hyperspace card.

And yet, I also love the literature of ideas that takes place in the here and now. What will happen if censorship runs amok? Will there come a time when people will be prohibited from having any books? If they caught them, will they combust at the temperature paper burns, 451 degrees Fahrenheit? Ray Bradbury wrote about it.

If a time-traveler goes on safari to the age of the dinosaurs, what will happen if he steps on an insect? What repercussions will it have? Ray Bradbury wrote a marvelous short story about it.

Alas, today another Grand Master of Science Fiction has left us.

Ray Douglas Bradbury

August 22, 1920 – June 5, 2012

herumtreiber: (pensive)
Below, the results of a test I took:

Which philosopher are you?
Your Result: Sartre/Camus (late existentialists)
 

The world is absurd. No facts govern it. We live well once we truly accept the world's absurdity. YOU give our life's meaning, and YOU control your world. (see Nietzsche for very closely tied beliefs) --This quiz was made by S. A-Lerer.

Nietzsche
 
W.v.O. Quine / Late Wittgenstein
 
Early Wittgenstein / Positivists
 
Immanuel Kant
 
Plato (strict rationalists)
 
Aristotle
 
Which philosopher are you?
Quiz Created on GoToQuiz


I like Camus' outlook on life. There's  grace in the way he writes:

For an absurd work of art to be possible, thought in its most lucid form must be involved in it. But at the same time, thought must not be apparent except as the regulating intelligence.

From 'The myth of Sisyphus' by Albert Camus.

This philosophy is comforting, and it also yields good stuff to make fics out of. Just sayin'.



herumtreiber: (Default)
The beginning of a story is important. It sets the tone and mood, and sells the tale. The ending is also important because, for me, it is how I tend to remember the story. I read a quote of the end of 'A tale of two cities' by Charles Dickens; I was intrigued and got it.

So here's the beginning and end of that tale. To make it more interesting, in between is a Loki/Thor gif :)

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way--in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.

"It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done;it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known."

herumtreiber: (jacket!Jake)
From this post

a. Below there are twelve fragments of books I've read and have at hand in my library.
b. If you want to play, what's the title of each book and its author? If it's a series, what's the name and in which specific book is the fragment?
c. You cannot google character names or sentences, but if you do happen to recall the title but not the author, google away!



The answers... )


herumtreiber: (bw!Jake)
My good friend [livejournal.com profile] intimisky gave me the letter 'J'


1. Post the names of five fictional characters whose names begin with that letter, and your thoughts on each. The characters can be from books, movies, or TV shows.
2. If you want me to give you a letter, say so.


My favorite characters whose names begin with J:



Joan of Arc

In the middle of the longest war in Western history, France is on its knees; the countryside ravaged and Paris occupied. The English king has been crowned in Paris. What powerful nobleman will save the country?

In a historical twist that is the stuff of legends, it is a peasant girl who will rise to the occasion. Armed with her faith and visions, Joan of Arc leads an army that raises the siege of Orléans and inspires her countrymen. Her figure shines through the centuries.






Jacob Black

He's passionate, intense and resourceful. He's stubborn, determined to win his love. At first I hoped Bella would choose him, but I soon came to realize she wouldn't. Bella has all the depth of a puddle of rain after a five-minute drizzle.

Doesn't matter though, it's far, far more interesting to write about Edward and Jake getting together. Plotting ways to do Bella in doesn't hurt. At all.






James T. Kirk

The effects may be cheesy but I love the interactions of Kirk, Spock and McCoy in Star Trek:TOS.  Spock being taunted by McCoy and behaving all logical while Jim gallivants off to smooch the lady in turn. Star Trek had some episodes written by great sci-fi authors like Harlan Ellison and Theodore Sturgeon  And Kirk/Spock is the original slash couple too.






Jean Valjean

The central figure of The Miserables. The man who goes to jail for stealing a loaf of bread, who is flawed and will later rescue and raise Cosette. The ending of this book is quite sad, not only because of Valjean's suffering, but also because the story ended. I was so immersed in the universe Victor Hugo wrote about, I wanted the book to go on and on.





Lady Jessica

In Dune, the sun is your enemy and the moons, your friends. This is an inhospitable planet where the sandstorms can scour the flesh off your body and the gigantic sandworms rise up from the deep.

After her lover, Duke Leto, is betrayed and the evil Harkonnens occupy Dune, Jessica flees into the desert with her son, Paul Atreides. She is a very capable woman who is armed with her Bene Gesserit education. Their fight for survival lies at the centerpiece of Frank Herbert's majestic novel.



herumtreiber: (cartoon)
I snagged this meme from my good friend [livejournal.com profile] intimisky.



Here's what it's about:

a. Below there are twelve fragments of books I've read and have at hand in my library.
b. If you want to play, what's the title of each book and its author? If it's a series, what's the name and in which specific book is the fragment?
c. You cannot google character names or sentences, but if you do happen to recall the title but not the author, google away!
d. In a later post I'll publish the results (meanwhile, the comments will be screened)




The books... )



herumtreiber: (lol wut??)
[Error: unknown template qotd]"Earthman," he said, "it is sometimes hard to follow your mode of
speech. Remember I have been asleep inside this planet of
Magrathea for five million years and know little of these early
sixties sit coms of which you speak. These creatures you call
mice, you see, they are not quite as they appear. They are merely
the protrusion into our dimension of vast hyperintelligent pan-
dimensional beings. The whole business with the cheese and the
squeaking is just a front."


The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas Adams


herumtreiber: (Owl_post)
Ganked from my flist.


It is National Book Week. Grab the closest book to you. Turn to page 56. Copy the 5th sentence as your status. Don't mention the book. (Post these rules as well.)

"From the austerity and tranquility of her medieval world, the penetrating gaze of this legendary Sybil of a holy nun would exorcise the horrors which materialize before our eyes in the name of television."
herumtreiber: (bite_me)
Ganked from [livejournal.com profile] karaokegal 




Your result for The Are You Truly Erudite? Test...

True English Nerd

You scored 79 erudition!

Not only do you know your subjects from your objects and your definite from your indefinite articles, but you've got quite a handle on the literature and the history of the language as well. Huzzah, and well done! The English snobs of Boston salute you.

Take The Are You Truly Erudite? Test at HelloQuizzy

herumtreiber: (bite_me)
Ganked from [livejournal.com profile] karaokegal 




Your result for The Are You Truly Erudite? Test...

True English Nerd

You scored 79 erudition!

Not only do you know your subjects from your objects and your definite from your indefinite articles, but you've got quite a handle on the literature and the history of the language as well. Huzzah, and well done! The English snobs of Boston salute you.

Take The Are You Truly Erudite? Test at HelloQuizzy

herumtreiber: (Default)
[Error: unknown template qotd]
Si te quiero es porque sos
mi amor, mi cómplice y todo
y en la calle codo a codo
somos mucho más que dos

Te quiero, Mario Benedetti

The poem is very good, and the song too.
herumtreiber: (Default)
[Error: unknown template qotd]
Si te quiero es porque sos
mi amor, mi cómplice y todo
y en la calle codo a codo
somos mucho más que dos

Te quiero, Mario Benedetti

The poem is very good, and the song too.

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